Dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants

Flowering plants are often divided into two major groups - dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants.  Although these two groups are no longer considered valid by taxonomists, they are useful for gaining a general understanding of how plants function. Below are the general characteristics of the two groups, note that there are exceptions to all these characteristics.  

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monodico2.GIF (4582 bytes)

Dicotyledonous

Plants

 

 

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One embryo leaf - cotyledon

bullet1.gif (1006 bytes) Tap root system - one main root with side roots
bullet1.gif (1006 bytes) Leaves with net venation
bullet1.gif (1006 bytes) Secondary growth in stems
bullet1.gif (1006 bytes) Whorls in flowers made up of four or five parts
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     Monocotyledons

Plants

 

 

bullet1.gif (1006 bytes) One embryo leaf or cotyledon
bullet1.gif (1006 bytes) Adventitious root system - no one root dominant
bullet1.gif (1006 bytes) Leaves with parallel venation
bullet1.gif (1006 bytes) Usually no secondary growth in stems
bullet1.gif (1006 bytes) Whorls in flowers made up of  three parts

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